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"W" Dog Breed Standards

Check the Breed Standards Beginning with the Letter "W" Before You Look for Puppies for Sale Today!

Do Your Homework to Insure Your Puppy Will Have a Long and Healthy Life Without Genetic Disease 

The breed standard for each breed of dog is distinct, giving a detailed "word picture" of the appearance and behavior of an idealized dog of that breed. Included in the breed standard description are externally observable aspects of appearance and behavior that are considered by the breed club to be the most important for the breed, and externally observable details of appearance or temperament that are considered by the breed club to be unacceptable (called faults). In addition most breed standards include an historical section, describing the place of origin and the original work done by the breed or its ancestor types.

However, breed standards DO NOT include testing requirements for health, requirements for genetic testing as required by ResearchBreeder.com, or requirements for specific types of training or work; breed standards are only intended to describe the breed's externally observable qualities. Breed clubs often make other requirements for health testing or work testing, but these are not covered in the breed standard itself.

Learn About Genetic Diseases and Disorders

Demodicosis/ Demodectic Mange: Demodex canis is a mite that is present in small numbers in the skin of most healthy dogs. Nursing puppies acquire the mite from their mothers during the first few days of life, and in most dogs there will never be any associated problems. In some dogs however, the normal balance is disrupted due to an immune defect. The mites multiply by the thousands in the hair follicles causing inflammation, in a condition called demodicosis. Demodicosis may be localized - that is, confined to 1 or more small discrete scaly reddened areas of hair loss, most commonly on the face or front legs. This is usually seen in pups of 3 to 6 months of age, and most cases resolve spontaneously. Alternately, generalized demodicosis may develop, at anywhere from 3 to 12 months of age. This is a severe skin condition. The defect in the cell-mediated immune system which allows the development of generalized demodicosis is believed to be inherited.

W

Weimaraner

weimaraner

Wire Fox Terrier

Wire Fox Terrier

Welsh Springer Spaniel

Welsh Springer Spaniel

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

wirehaired pointing griffon

Welsh Terrier

Welsh Terrier

Wirehaired Vizsla

Wirehaired Vizsla

West Highland White Terrier

West Highland White Terrier

Working Kelpie

No Standard on file.

Working Kelpie Dog

Whippet

Whippet    
White Swiss Shepherd Dog White Swiss Shepherd Dog